Tag Archives: Brian Michael Bendis

The TW Review – Marc Spector: producer, maniac, pimp

Yeah, let’s do this again.

For those who read the previous “TW Review” post, I teased of two reviews. Not happening. I had too much to say about the subject below, and honestly I can come back to the other book at another time. Carry on.

Moon Knight #3
Writer: Brian Michael Bendis, Artists: Alex Maleev, Matt Wilson, Cory Petit

Marc Spector wanders between many faces. That’s the character. He exemplifies the “super hero” who lacks the skill of decision making as well as the shell trying to morph its inner contents. Moon Knight gives home to any reader struggling with the concept of identity. Any poor sap unsure of what direction he or she wants to go in can relate to the Macabre Moon Knight, especially those less than satisfied with who they actually are.

Which, really, should strike a chord with us all.

Brian Michael Bendis snapped the reigns on the agent of jet and silver three months ago, taking over a character whose seen more than a fair share of failed creative attempts. Which has been a shame. Doug Moench and Bill Sienkiewicz crafted some wonderful comics with this character, and ever since Marvel has only published sludge for Moon Knight to star in. I’d argue the presence of some favorable bits in Charlie Huston’s run 0f 2006, but really Marvel, and the numerous creators involved, have only degraded Moon Knight’s status from subject of prestigious work to pulp joke.

The Bendis/Maleev direction appears willing to return Moon Knight to some sort of pedestal. The new found title sits ready to reclaim the glory of last decade’s Daredevil run. A book concerned with drama, street level focus, and character study. The Bendis/Maleev comic seems ready to further develop Marc Spector rather than play him as a poor man’s Batman.

It’s odd that I am only now discussing or reviewing this book. Besides Greg Bergas, I’m probably the most vocal Moon Knight guy online. I’m unsure what that says about me, that you know, Moon Knight is my peak of vocality , but so be it. Months before the release of Bendis/Maleev Moon Knight you, doubtfully, couldn’t shut me up. The news came as a blitzkrieg. The potential of Marvel Comics shined bright and friendly once again. My old stacks of MK comics found new attention. Hell, I even made big plans for this blog in the department of content.

I was all over this book and ready to read. Then it came out.

So why the clam up? The first issue gave me nothing new. Every bit of plot and concept that Marvel PR tossed to the media made it into the first issue yet nothing else. I knew going in that Marc Spector now possessed three new identities, and this concept turned out to be the big “reveal” of the series premiere. The cliffhanger shot or the pace setting issue Bendis holds such a reputation for failed terribly in my eyes.

To be fair, Bendis provided warning in the book’s prior months of marketing. I forget the exact quote, but he spoke out saying most comics give their all in the first issue, and after that they sort of trail off and no one ever talks about them again. A point which stands as totally correct. This era of comics revolves around first issue buzz. No one shows concern for issue #7 or discusses series on issue-to-issue protocol. A mission to bring back to style the issue-to-issue narrative felt like a bold one – another reason why I was so stoked for this new comic.

Still, a certain vibe was attained with the actual reading. Seeing the not-so-new, new first issue in print quelled my excitement. I understood the writer’s need not to blow the load out of the gate, but I would have liked some sort of tease or battle cry rather than a lame “yeah, you know.” It’s always nice to stand up and clap when you’re the audience, but instead Moon Knight #1 conveyed a feeling of “well, I guess we have to get this into the actual comic so it matters, huh?”.

I enjoyed #1 fair enough, but it never made me shout with glee. In my storm of reading though, I’ve caught up on the new Bendis/Maleev project. I now emote glee.

So, yeah, that’s all context for the next two paragraphs or so of review. Oh well. Issue #3!

Bendis showcases how well he can write the character in this issue. Like most Bendis comics, the plot doesn’t stretch far but that’s OK. Instead, Bendis uses extended moments to document Spector’s interactions while also setting up a supporting cast. This comic is a good example of the term we know as “decompression.” Not that it’s really decompressed, necessarily. Plot movement falls short, but the comic never wastes any time – which seems to be the main idea of “decompression.” No, instead Bendis uses decompressed story telling the way Ellis and Hitch intended it. Extended moments shine light on intimate details and highlight character ticks we will want to know. The comic gives us a close look at the newly reformed Marc Spector a.k.a. Moon Knight.

Wolverine, Spider-man, and Captain America certainly work within Spector’s newly forged system of multiple personalities, but remember, Spector’s working the west coast and strutting his stuff as a TV producer. The man has a day job, and Bendis uses the day job as a backdrop to further explore Spector’s psyche.  Issue #3 opens with a scene cast straight from Tarantino’s True Romance with Spector whizzing his way up the Californian coastline in a convertible.  On the way, Maleev makes point to detail the character’s wardrobe, and Bendis creates a scene of flirtation between Spector and one Maya Lopez (whom Spector spent the night with). The comic rolls along until Spector arrives on the set of his big, new television show. Words are shared with his assistant, and we are even privy in Spector’s work day as he actually shows concern for producing a well-crafted production. Then things turn dark. Bendis writes a flashback to show Spector’s hiring of an ex-S.H.I.E.L.D. agent. Purpose? Sidekick or partner of some kind. To fully trust a partner though, Spector pushes this agent through an unnatural test. Spector tortures the man while dressed as the less than kind Bullseye. Why? To see if this potential partner spills any beans on his possible employer. The scene ends, and the ex-S.H.I.E.L.D. speaks, “man, how crazy are you?”.

The issue revolves completely around the concept of identity, or more specifically the different kinds of roles we play in our everyday lives. While that is familiarly a Brubaker theme, Bendis knows how to make it his own with his portrayal of character. Spector works as a Hollywood hotshot, but that includes many things. In this case, television producer equals working man, pimp (as in ladies man not the traditional definition), and maniac. Spector becomes Bendis’s filter for Hollywood stereotype. He represents the ideas of corporate art we all dream of. The rock star playboy comes out with Maya. The power hungry, coked-up suit plays when the lights are turned down. In the middle, a working man presents passion for his project.

Boom, boom, and boom. The issue rolls out each identity, each person, very well by way of smooth pacing. Each segment just flows right into the next.

It’s a solid way to keep to the character’s core while also providing some sense of relevancy to our world. In the day and age of super hero movies, it makes a lot of sense for a super hero to comment on Hollywood. There’s also that matter of Bendis currently developing his own television series. I’d like to think Spector’s time as a TV producer provides some sort of personal expression of Bendis’s new found experiences.  Art reflecting life seems appropriate in this situation, especially if Bendis currently suffers his own identity crisis. I’m afraid only he knows that.

Of course, the separation of roles works just as well for the fictional character as it does the real world. Oddly enough, the three roles presented in this issue match up with Spector’s original trio of masks. The pimp, the playboy totally belongs to Spector’s Steven Grant persona – the millionaire, Bruce Wayne-type who wore the hot blonde on his arm. The working man goes to taxi driver Jake Lockley, and the maniac is right up the alley of Marc Spector the loose cannon mercenary.

What Bendis has done is taken Spector’s original three personae and multiplied it by two. There are three heroes, and there are three Marc Spectors. Just like us who work within one name yet act like different people within different situations, Spector now experiences the same. While he may appear slightly more stable, Spector is in all honesty more fucked up than ever. Doubt me? The dude holds 6 personalities to his name.

And this is the guy with the head of Ultron, working the case of the West Coast Kingpin. Bendis has me by the nuts.

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the chemical box – episode 008 – death via committee

A new Chemical Box Podcast, hosted by Joey Aulisio and myself, is available. Here are the details…

in this week’s episode joey and alec discuss the current state and uncertain future of vertigo comics, our anticipation and concerns about grant morrison and rags morales’ upcoming run on action comics, episode 48.1 of the excellent wait what? podcast, the death of spider-man storyline (ultimate spider-man #155-160) by brian michael bendis and mark bagley, the amazing spider-man teaser trailer, new avengers #9-13 by brian michael bendis with howard chaykin and mike deodato, avengers #13-14 by brian michael bendis with chris bachalo and john romita jr., our love is real by sam humphries and steven sanders, and supergirl #65 by kelly sue deconnick and chriscross.

music by animals as leaders

You can listen by clicking here, or you can download the show, in iTunes, here.

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Some Things Just Don’t Change

Brian Michael Bendis means many things to many people, but for the longest time Bendis, to me,  meant company bullshit and the error of super-hero comics. I’m not necessarily sure why. I think it was a matter of his position and the frustration I felt toward Marvel. You see, they raised prices at the time of my highest “hate,” and, well, I was one of those “3.99 protesters.” I know, I know. Something I should probably keep hidden nor does it really have anything to do with Bendis,but whatever. I was there, and I’m past it now that I actually read my comics…Anyway, Bendis…not my favorite dude in the heyday of late 2009/early 2010. His books were 3.99, his Avengers did plenty of talking, and Siege was on the horizon.

“Fuck this guy,” I thought. “My days of Ultimate Spider-man respect are gone.”

Taking Marvel Readers for the usual spin, Siege came and went, but while so, news broke.

“In July, writer Brian Michael Bendis and artist Alex Maleev examine those questions and more when “Scarlet,” their new ongoing, bi-monthly creator owned series from Marvel Comics’ Icon imprint, begins. We spoke with Bendis about the project…”
Comic Book Resources

July, Bendis back to his roots, and I gave it a shot. Boy, I’m glad I did so.

Scarlet’s still some sense of the traditional Bendis. Characters talk while stories span more than a few issues. There’s even that sense of slow down mid-arc while the last chapter inspires thoughts of, “what happens next.” Bendis writes this book through and through. No doubt about it. On a larger playing field though, this book resembles something like a rejection slip or a mighty middle finger aimed at all the nay sayers and labels. Yes, in some sense, this is Bendis’ Recovery. Here’s the album where the artist, while not totally reinvented, comes out and exclaims, “I’ve still got it.” That “it,” in this case, would be Bendis’ ability to bring something a little different and exciting to the comics market.  Scarlet proclaims Bendis’ right to still be in this game.

Part of the Scarlet’s statement simply comes from the creator-owned aspect. We have this odd perception in the comics scene that when a creator goes creator-owned it means some sense of “rebellion.” Kirkman, I think, is owed much thanks for this perception. The original Image guys inspired this idea nearly twenty years ago, but I think for this current era Kirkman steals the show. That manifesto went a long way, and it still lingers in the air now. He, whether he wished it not, made creator-owned this quasi-bad boy act where the artist can tell the company man to fuck off and seemingly be ok.

Not saying Bendis is telling Marvel to fuck off – that would honestly make no sense -, but the bare aesthetic of a creator-owned comic encourages thoughts of breaking the mold. Scarlet being Bendis’ first major creator-owned work since Powers, the book that got attention, says something about the writer’s place as of now. After ten years of being Marvel’s go-to boy with an on-and-off creator-owned book floating in the background, Scarlet makes us all suddenly question. Is Bendis just the “Avengers guy?”

That answer would be no. Our attentions are so caught up in who this guy is today that we forget Brian Michael Bendis wrote and drew as an indie comics creator. Before Ultimate Spider-man, the world knew Bendis as Fire and Goldfish. And Bendis still talks about these books, more than a decade later. Listen to any Bendis Tapes on John Siuntres’ Word Balloon Podcast, and I bet Bendis will name drop a few of those early books. Why? I think they are still strongly attached to him. This isn’t a guy who found a Marvel gig and said, “Ok, now I start.” This is a guy who loved doing his early stuff, and he never tries to cover it up. Bendis still pushes copies of Jinx and Torso; he wants the world to know what he’s capable of. Scarlet, and really this entire wave of new creator-owned material from Bendis, is another step in that direction. A certain amount of it disproves the majority perception, but another piece of the pie is a return to form. Bendis’ core, I think, is creator-owned, and Scarlet exists as a call back to that.

But it’s not all in the book’s appearance and identity; the story itself holds meaning. This book kicks off with a female protagonist who, right out of the gate, strangles a man and tells us why. The bare action isn’t the point, though. The “how” is.

Scarlet breaks the fourth wall. The technique should clue us in. The author wants to talk. Let’s look at this line: “I’m sorry to be right in your face like this. I know you were looking for a little diversionary fun. I know you were subconsciously hoping you could just watch without any of it actually involving you” (Issue 1, Pg. 4).  Hmmm. Involving “you.” This goes back to my idea typed above. While Scarlet in the story is on a mission to instigate revolution and wants “your” help, Bendis is clearly speaking for his own cause here. The thought of looking for some “diversionary fun” without involvement so sums up a majority of comics readers and specifically the readers invested in Bendis’ Marvel work. Stuff like Avengers and the event books are so spelled out, and people read them as diversion. I mean, that kind of is the point of entertainment, but comics readers, as most on the internet should know, take the concept of thinking and multiply the aspect of pain tenfold. Remember Final Crisis? Yeah, people bitched. Why? They wanted the story’s “hows” and “whys” spelled out.

Bendis’ work kind of contributes to this. His style of storytelling, the decompression we’ve all come to love, is the norm in today’s mainstream comics. It’s become Marvel’s house style of writing, and it’s possibly conditioned readers to be, well, lazy. Decompression lets everything see time on the panel. Thought needs no part of the reading process when the writing is such because the writer can literally tell you everything.

But Bendis wants “you” involved in this one. He wants “you” to think and contribute. He, again, wants us to see him differently.

This opening houses another important aspect, though. Maybe more important than the line about contribution. It’s how it’s written. When we think of Bendis, we think of dialogue and long scenes of transacting characters. It’s the Bendis trademark. Scarlet breaking the wall reminds readers of that and reminds in a fresh way. The opening scene jolts us. It’s Bendis writing dialogue but not in a fashion we expect. Characters sit no where near a table, but rather one pissed off woman looks directly at us. Sure, she delivers a few lines of meta statement, but her plain action almost says more. She’s just talking, but she’s taking the Bendisism in a different direction.

Bendis, because of his sometimes overuse of dialogue, has lost some of his shine. Rather than it now being his gift, dialogue has almost become his curse, and it’s not something readers look forward to but rather dread. This opening feels like Bendis taking control again, though. The switch in approach makes the dialogue feel special again. The moment sounds a lot like the opening seconds on Eminem’s “Cold Wind Blows.” The exclamations of “I’m back” and “Some things just don’t change” seem appropriate in this moment. It’s Bendis doing his finest Bendis and showing that he is still the guy for dialogue. No one does it better.

The story continues as Scarlet opens up her operation and rubs the dirt further across her hands. Cops die and pressures increase, but the series unfolds in other ways. I want to point out the statement made by this comicbook, but I also feel it shouldn’t be limited to that. Scarlet has more to offer as a story. Namely, the use of a female lead. For a tale about rising up and speaking out against oppression, following a woman around seems like the only right idea. The male voice could make a point here, and maybe convey some similar feelings, but making the character female brings much more by simple nature of context. Plus, Bendis has history with the lady lead, and Scarlet makes a lot of sense in his larger body of work. Jessica Jones meet Scarlet.

But, yes. The context. This is the woman taking back her world and executing revenge on the men who made her suffer. Sounds about right. Where on the surface Bendis shapes Scarlet to represent the common, downtrodden, middle class person, Scarlet herself takes on another shape. She’s a symbol. A symbol for what we are told and a symbol for the woman as an entity. Here’s a woman who feels the need to speak and speak loud in a culture where men seem to make the rules. Plus, she’s tearing down the rules and citing them as wrong. It’s almost like this woman scorned is the release of hundreds of years of built up aggression. The denial of school, jobs, voting, and sexuality are all being voiced against right here, through Scarlet. Maybe Bendis wants that, maybe he doesn’t. I see it, though, and I think it’s impossible not to because the fiery red of Scarlet’s hair and the show of midriff only catch the eyes.

So, to wrap up, I blame this book for my resurgence of Bendis reading. While not necessarily something game changing or even solid, Scarlet shows me that Brian Bendis can still make a point and make a comic with a layer or two. I lost faith in this dude for a while, but it feels like Bendis is hitting a new creative stride. He still needs to speak and deserves to do so. He still makes interesting comics. I’m happy about that.

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No Clever Title Needed #2

When thoughts cannot stand on their own, they are tossed here, into a blog post that can go anywhere. More random thoughts for your soul! Or your brain. Or something.

I travelled to Pittsburgh, Pa this past Thursday in order to take part in Norma Jean’s recent tour. For those on the outside, Norma Jean is a pretty sweet metal/hardcore group, and I enjoy them very much. Now, while this was not my first show, or “concert” as the old term goes, it was the first one where I was actually a big fan of the performer. Granted, KISS and Anamanaguchi (whom I have both seen) put on fun, exciting shows, but there is something extra when watching a live performance and you know the exact moment to nod your head or pluck your air guitar. I had that experience, and I totally lived it, pushing my way to the front of the crowd, taking part in the pushing and shoving as the music drilled on. The time was great, and Mr. Smalls Theater, the venue hosting the show, definitely holds a cool aesthetic quality as it still showcases a few stain glass windows from the times when it was a church.

Here are a few (blurry) pictures of the show:

Norma Jean at Mr. Smalls

Norma Jean at Mr. Smalls

Norma Jean at Mr. Smalls

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A year ago, my opinion on Brian Michael Bendis was not very positive. Today, I cannot get enough of this guy. Why the sudden shift? I have learned to look past the “evil company man” reputation and see Bendis’ work for what it really is. Yes, the guy’s work does dictate the Marvel line of comics to some degree, and, yes, he does cheerlead for Marvel quite a bit, but I feel these acts now geniune rather than cycnical. His recent activity shows me that this guy is still very much an artist first and a sales man second. The Bendis Tapes, over on the Word Balloon Podcast, have been pretty straight forward the past few months, and the guy has been launching a whole slew of new creator-owned projects while also making his main line Marvel work shine.Bendis is the real deal, as he probably always has been.

Most may complain that his Avengers talk too much, but that is the take, and I for one find it very interesting. Not because they are talking necessarily but because Bendis is using the dialogue to explore the super-hero genre in a different light, showing these characters as the people they really are, wrapping their lives in a Mighty Marvel drama while backdropping against time travel, Civil Wars, and Norman Osborn.

So, I am on “Team Bendis” as you may call it. At least, that is what my buddy Joey Aulisio calls it. I am picking up a majority of his work right now, and I am excited about what this guy is doing in comics because I feel Bendis still have things to say. He is not a hack nor does he phone anything in.

With this recent positivity, I have even returned to titles such as Avengers and Ultimate Spider-man. Books I loved at one time and then dropped due to my “anti-corporate comics” phase, I am now back with, rapidly picking up any and all backissues I can find from the time I have missed. So far, my actions have been successful, nearly having all the books I need to read the entire sagas of Bendis’ Avengers and Spider-man work.

So, the point? I like Bendis again.

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I know not much of Jim Shooter, the one time editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics, but I really enjoy his new blog.

It is basically Jim Shooter chronicled as he, by way of his handy computer assistant, relates to us his own history in the comics industry. And hey, he is detailing the events chronologically.

Jim Shooter can be a guy with a bad reputation, but if you are not already, read this guy’s blog. I am learning a lot.

http://www.jimshooter.com/

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Mark Waid on Daredevil, eh? To be honest, I was really looking forward to the announcement of the new Daredevil creative team, but when I first heard Waid I figured that would be a book I skip. Now, I am not so sure. Waid has given an interview discussing his plans and take, and I like what he has to say so far as he looks to bring back the “swashbuckling,” high-adventure Daredevil. Granted, he says the book will still retain some of its crime elements, but I could go for a Daredevil fighting Stilt-man. That is a Daredevil I have never actually read while in comics because the DD title has been consistantly noir ever since I began. Waid’s take could prove to be a nice change of pace. Plus, the guy has Paolo Rivera and Marcos Martin at his disposal. Those are good artists.

Daredevil by Marcos Martin

As for Greg Rucka on Punisher? I feel like I am skipping that. I like Rucka’s writing well enough, but from what he described it sounds like another Punisher book that delves into the dark and gritty environment of street crime and guns. That stuff is cool, yeah, but I have read it before, and Rucka is not high enough on my list to make me excited about that take on the Punisher.
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I have other thoughts, but I want to turn those into full blog posts of their own. So, as usual, thanks for reading and comments are always welcome. I see the numbers for this thing, so I know people read it; I just need to hear from you.

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It’s a Good Time

Moon Knight art from Alex Maleev

Yes it is. As someone who holds a strong appreciation for the Moon Knight character, right now is a great time to be a comic book reader. For quite a while his presence was either lacking or not high quality, but it seems like that is all about to change. Marvel is pushing, putting forth their best efforts to put the man of jet and silver in the forefront.

I could not be anymore excited.

I never really hold that much affinity for certain comic book characters. I tend to not read books specifically to just see what characters are up to that particular month. To me, super-hero characters tend to act more as bodies for concepts, and it is the creative talent behind the character that which matters. The character is fictional (obviously), but what a writer or artist can say with a character is not. Super-heroes, especially the casts of the Marvel and DC Universes, work as great, modern day myths, providing fine creative folk opportunity to explore themes not so fantastic on the surface. The capes and cowls provide a dress and harness life’s large ideas and bring them down in a form fit to work in a story. That is usually the way I look at super-heroes. They are characters, but more importantly devices, and writers that understand that tend to produce if not great, then at least interesting comic books.

Moon Knight kind of breaks that mold for me though. While he is very much the shell for a set of ideas, I do read the character for the character’s sake. His character is one I will gladly check in on, and I have read many bad Moon Knight comics just because he was featured in them. I mean, I’m not total “fanboy” about the character, complaining if the costume doesn’t match or if Khonshu pops up or not, but I do buy his various series or appearances like a “fanboy.” When I consider why, I think it all just goes back to when I first found Moon Knight. As a reader, I was living in a world where Spider-man and the Fantastic Four were the “be all, end all.”  These characters, these concepts so “super-heroy” with their spandex suits, powers, catch phrases and wild cast of villains. My reading of only these types of comics was a version of a sheltered, conservative lifestyle. I knew nothing else, and comic books only held that specific visual idea of Spider-man and the FF. Then came a specific issue of Ultimate Spider-man, seventy-nine (79), and gracing the final page in full splash art glory was a character not steeped in the bright blue and red hues of costume attire. Instead, he carried shadows, and his first act before my eyes was his defeat of Spider-man. When I think back to that moment, it was actually pretty meta. One character knocking out the other for my attention. It was sort of a shift in my comic book world view. Moon Knight showed up and opened the door, and ever since I have always found him a character that strikes my interest. For me, he carries this vibe of mystery and and this persona of cool. It is hard to ignore, especially when his actual visual look is considered.

I have carried this enjoyment since then, checking in on all incarnations of the character. For a while, it was simply for the “he’s my favorite” motivation, but in the last year I have really begun to appreciate the character on a whole new level. Moon Knight, all the way back to his origin, is the character so trying to do good. Marc Spector is the man with the questionable instincts and history, but he so wants to be a hero, to be something beyond human. He can never quite achieve that though, and at times the character must face what he truly is inside. I look at that, and I see such a universal concept. We are all Marc Spector. Everyone wants to be someone they are not, forgetting all of their personal faults and leaving behind the earthy shackles of humanity. His character, in such a Marvel way, represents that, and I feel like so many overlook it, labeling Moon Knight simply as “Marvel’s Batman” or a character only suitable for crime stories. Yes, he does work great on a crime story level, but Moon Knight is also much more and his concept can work in many settings. It just takes a skilled writer.

Moon Knight and Cast by Bill Sienkiewicz

Now comes Brian Michael Bendis: a writer who has produced many enjoyable comics, and oddly enough introduced me to Moon Knight. Marvel’s A-game is coming to my favorite character, and from the interviews I have read Bendis’ take looks to really work. I cannot say for certain because the book is months away, but the sole concept of Moon Knight playing “The Avengers” and creating new personas to act as Wolverine or Spider-man is so true to the character. Yes, at the surface it does feel like a very fresh take, but when you look at it it hits the core. Moon Knight is still playing hero and being someone else. Bendis’ “pitch”, his take alone sells to me that the man understands the character. Plus, he looks to also add to the character, putting him in a new setting and taking a step further. How could I ask for more? Oh yeah, Alex Maleev is drawing it. I know Maleev says he does not want to do Sienkiewicz’s Moon Knight, but I cannot help but look at his art so far and see a homage to Bill. An homage that also still feels very Maleev. That is fucking awesome.

I have appreciated the character since 2006, and since 2006 I have been scoffed at for feeling any appreciation. The original stuff usually gets cred, but anything new usually sees flack. Most of it deserves so (except for Charlie Huston’s first arc, “The Bottom”), but I still grow tired of the internet putting Moon Knight down. He is not “Marvel’s Batman.” Honestly, he is one of the most interesting Marvel characters, up there with Daredevil in my opinion. Now is a chance for people to really see that. Marvel is putting two A-listers on this character, and they are putting forth effort to market and create real excitement. I don’t know if this will happen again in such a way with Moon Knight. At least not for a long while. I am sure plenty will still complain about this book and see Moon Knight as nothing significant, but I honestly don’t give a fuck. This, in an odd sense, is a dream come true comic book for me, and I am going to enjoy every last second of it. For ever how many issues are published, I will be talking about this book, even if in some shocking way it sucks (I really doubt it though). I will also live in the build up to the series by re-reading all the old stuff, soaking up all the glory and interesting failure that is Moon Knight. I’m sure further writing will take place up this very blog.

I am a Moon Knight FAN, and I am damn proud. May 2011, I await you.

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